Tag Archives: Indian food

First 500 Likes!

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Its just been a little under two months when I published my first post on ‘A Homemaker’s World’ and I proudly mention the first 500 likes on my blog.

Thank you all for appreciating and encouraging me with your compliments every time I post on the blog.

This means a lot to me and will definitely take my zest for writing more interesting posts and articles one step ahead.

Hugs!!

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Dessert Desires: Carrot Fudge

Sweet cravings after a meal run in my family’s genes it seems (And no, thankfully it doesn’t translate into diabetes). Its not just my family, on asking some friends educated me of the fact that most people crave a sweet dish after meals. And specific to our home, we usually keep the Agra ka petha (the city of the Taj Mahal, Agra, is famous for this), a packet of Fox’s sweets, cream wafers, etc. as the after dinner saviors.

But this time I came across this yummy and nutritious recipe of Baby Carrot Burfi (Read: Carrot Fudge) by TasteBuds and decided to make these to satiate my family’s dessert desires for atleast a week.

These turned out to be absolutely sumptuous and I would certainly recommend this recipe. It’s easy to make and the results are in front of you!! 🙂

Baby Carrot Burfi

Its made with carrots, full cream milk, sugar, khoya (condensed milk, in the form of  tough milk block), ghee (clarified butter), cardamom powder and nuts for the garnish.

The milk is brought to a boil and grated carrot is added. The mixture of milk and carrot is cooked on a low-medium flame until the milk gets absorbed by the carrot. This step is followed by adding sugar and khoya. I used negligible amounts of ghee, to lower the fat intake and also because khoya on heating starts leaving ghee, enough to provide the required greasing. Finally, cardamom is added and the fudge is set in a tin box and garnished with nuts. I used almonds and cashews. Once cooled, the fudge is cut into squares to give the shape of Burfi. The sumptuous carrot burfis are ready to eat.

Thank you TasteBuds, this recipe will now be a constant on my favorite homemade desserts list.

P.S.: For complete recipe, you can visit Baby Carrot Burfi on TasteBuds.

 

Want Some Buttermilk aka Neer Mor?

Delhi is scorching under the June sun and the blistering heat is taking away all the zest for life it seems…phewwww!!! And if this wasn’t enough, the daily chores bore you out.

But cooking yummy food never fails to reinvigorate my soul to keep going. So today’s lunch menu was all South Indian, and I just relish this cuisine to the core. That’s one reason South Indian dishes topped my list when I chose to start honing my culinary skills.

And today, just when I was about to finish preparing lunch, my need to quench my thirst made my mind run through a list of cold summer drinks that I could immediately make. With South Indian food on my mind, what better than a glass of BUTTERMILK. “Mmmmm….Yummy Choice”, my brain said and I got down to making the quick and easy buttermilk, one drink that would make your gut say ‘Thank You!’ after a heavy meal.

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Buttermilk is also know by the names of ‘Chhach’, ‘Lassi’, ‘Chaas’, ‘Mattha’, ‘Neer Mor’, etc. all over India.

This summer special drink not only lower’s the body heat, it is an excellent probiotic, great for lactose-intolerant people (as it is made of curd), brilliant for digestion, and packed with nutritional value.

I made the South Indian style Buttermilk, which is a spicy-salty blend of curd, water, green chillis, ginger, curry leaves, coriander powder, black salt and a hint of asafoetida. A tempering of mustard seeds (Rai/Sarson), asafoetida and curry leaves enhances the flavour of Buttermilk aka Neer Mor in South India.

Do try this on a hot summer afternoon and I bet you will relish every sip of it.

Its Gujarati Farsaan Time at Home-Sumptuous Khandvi

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Okay, so its one of those phases when I decide to make something new and interesting in my kitchen every other day.

I chose to make a Gujarati farsaan (Read: Gujarati snack) called Khandvi for the evening.

It is one delectable snack with that sweet and salty flavour characteristic to Gujarati food, topped with the softness of mini rolls and garnished with freshly grated coconut. This is a non-fried snack and is tongue tempting to the core.

My sister, a big foodie and fan of my cooking, is sitting with all eyes on the kitchen entrance, where I carefully lay each Khandvi roll on the platter, ready for the coconut garnish finale. On the other hand, my mom, also with her eyes set on the kitchen door; but not getting the complete view of the culinary corner of the house; is petrified and curious to know the mess that I might have made of the whole experiment.

Finally, I emerge from the kitchen to present one of the most enticing snacks I have ever made. And what I receive in return is two bright faces, one ready for the Gujarati treat and the other happy for her daughter adding another dish to her culinary skills, a piece of ‘essential’ information that would eventually go on that matrimonial website.

Anyways, since Khandvi is a snack best had in evenings, I put the platter in refrigerator to be had later with tomato ketchup and/or mint chutney!!

Mmmmm….Lip smacking, isn’t it!

Okay don’t be jealous, here’s the recipe for you. Make it at home and tell me how it turned out.

Recipe for Making Khandvi

Ingredients

For Khandvi Mixture

  1. 1 cup besan (Bengal gram flour)
  2. 1 cup curd (yoghurt)
  3. 1 cup water
  4. A pinch of hing (Asafoetida)
  5. Few drops of lemon juice
  6. 1/4 tsp Haldi powder (Turmeric)
  7. 2 tsp of chilli-ginger paste
  8. Salt to Taste
  9. 1 ½ to 2 tsp Sugar
  10. Oil for Greasing

For the Tempering

  1. 2 tsp Oil
  2. 1 tsp Rai/Sarson seeds (Mustard)
  3. 1 tsp Safed Til (Sesame seeds)
  4. 1/4 tsp Hing (Asafoetida)

Method

  1. Grease 3 thalis (steel plates) of 10” diameter each with oil on both sides and keep aside
  2. Combine all ingredients of Khandvi mix and whisk well to avoid lumps and form a smooth mix
  3. Switch on the flame of the pan and cook for 10 minutes (Approx.) and keep stirring continuously
  4. Spread a spoonful of the batter on greased thali, wait for few seconds, if it starts rolling the mix is ready to spread, else cook for few more minutes
  5. While the mixture is still hot, spread the mix to form a thin layered spread on all three thalis separately using a flat spoon
  6. Allow to cool for 5 to 10 minutes, make approx. 5 slits across the thali with a knife and roll them tightly into mini rolls
  7. For the tempering, heat oil in a pan and add mustard seeds and asafoetida and sauté
  8. Add sesame seeds and let them crackle
  9. Pour the tempering on the plated khandvis evenly
  10. Garnish with freshly grated coconut and coriander

The Khandvis are ready to be served with Ketchup and mint chutney.

Do try and share how you found these!

Its just the beginning

Hi there, all you homemakers, glad to have you here!

So here I am; after all these years of running around for studies, corporate life, challenges of the personal life; taking an altogether different route to connect back with my long lost friends, family, make new friends and share loads of stuff that forms an integral part of a homemaker’s life.

This is a platform for all the working/non-working, married/single women to share their thoughts, experiences, expertise and hobbies, speak their hearts out, share their daily challenges and their ways of dealing with them.

Check this space for cooking, home décor, fashion, beauty, DIY projects and much more. And not to forget sharing lots of personal daily life experiences, funny or emotional, with all you readers out there.